Plotting a path forward for Texas youth

How the State Board of Education works

flash.png

The SBOE is made up of 15 elected officials from across Texas who are responsible for making and revising standards regarding each subject offered in Texas schools.

Texas does not require health education in high school, but many school districts choose to offer elective health classes, which include sex education components. Some districts offer age-appropriate sex ed, like the names of body parts or skills for healthy friendships, at younger grades as well.

Districts that choose to teach sex education must follow minimum curriculum standards set by the SBOE: Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, or TEKS. These represent the minimum standards associated with courses in Texas. School districts can choose to go above and beyond the TEKS in selecting curricula for their students. 

In 2020, the SBOE revised these Health TEKS for the first time since the 1990s, fundamentally changing the map for adolescent health in the state. 

You can read the drafts of the TEKS and the approved final version here

Want more information? Check out this infographic to see the whole SBOE process.